Tag Archives: Maturity

Reactive/Proactive

As I speak to supply chain audiences, I focus on key messages that are important, but sometimes forget where they came from. One key message I focus on is that the best supply chain organizations are not “managing by project” – they consider that a type of management failure. Continue reading

The Credibility Gap

in the course of work, I frequently meet and talk to supply chain executives, and there’s one simple question I ask frequently to see what people are thinking about: “What prevents you from being successful in your role?” Many times we get the answer, “I’m implementing X”, where X may be S&OP, ERP, some special practice, outsourcing logistics, you name it. Then I clarify: “Isn’t X really just your job? What prevents you from being successful at implementing X?” That’s a showstopper, or at least a pause-inducer. Continue reading

The Supply Chain Management Process

The late Michael Hammer of “Re-engineering the Corporation” fame put it succinctly once in a forum I attended in Philadelphia: “An imperfect process is better than no process, and a good process is best of all.” I’ve looked at many Supply Chain maturity models for companies, and some look at vendor dimension – degree of collaboration – while another may look at resource – degree of rationalization. All are based however on having a supply chain management system which evolves to progressively improve overall supply chain performance. Continue reading

Rethinking Resources

There is a gap in thinking about resources at a company level that highlights the mental block about managing supply chain for most managers. If I were to speak to managers about Human Resources, and ask them what they thought of the following situation I would get a strong response: Suppose a company’s payroll is managed independently in each functional unit: Some employees might get paid weekly, some biweekly, some monthly or perhaps twice a month. Continue reading

Growing Up

Many years ago (September, 1994) I read an Scientific American article “Software’s Chronic Crisis” with interest – my job at the time being precisely “Software Development”. The article introduced me to “CMM” (Capability Maturity Model) in software development, as an aid to improving software to avoid the inevitable ‘crisis’. “Maturity” here didn’t connote age (there are certainly very old IT organizations I’ve worked in I would hardly call ‘mature’) but rather ‘well developed’. Continue reading

It Depends

The promise of Supply Chain re-engineering, like other management techniques, is the promise of a kind of business utopia where your business is growing, reducing costs, and simultaneously improving performance, all in a wonderfully self-optimizing system. Business people, however, are frequently rational, and to a rational business person, this utopian promise sounds a bit too good to be true. If you want to build up confidence in a supply chain center of expertise (COE) group, I’d suggest you try different tactics. A utopian solution is too hard to sell. Continue reading